Organizing Dialogue, Experience and Knowledge for Complex Problem-Solving

“Be hard by being tender!” [When Nietzsche Wept (part 2)]

by • August 22nd, 2006

So Dr. Breuer challenges Nietzsche. I wrote about the first six chapters a few days ago: my enthusiasm hasn’t dimmed. 🙂
“We are each composed of many parts, each clamoring for expression. We can be held responsible only for the final compromise, not for the wayward impulses of each of the parts” (300).
“’One must have chaos and frenzy within oneself to give birth to a dancing star.’” (179-180). [oft-quoted, even by the Deaf community!]
“The key to living well is
first to will that which is necessary
and then to love that which is willed
” (282).
“A tree requires stormy weather if it is to attain a proud height…creativity and discovery are begotten in pain” (179).
The notion of eternal recurrence (249-251) deserves its own post in the phenomenology thread (good section in wikipedia on Nietzsche’s view, emphasizing the thought rather than the physical reality of an eternal return). There’s something of the dialectic/dialogic in there (see p. 84, too). It has convinced me that it is time to read the copy of Thus Spake Zarathurstra that I picked up in Berlin last summer.
More on interpretation (I extrapolate): “ a series of meanings folded into” [an object, fill in the

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EL/LE

by • August 3rd, 2006

EL:LE.jpg Outline of a hand fingers down, blue

The title of the exhibition, “El/le”, has many layers of meaning in Turkish, and it is for this reason that we have preferred to retain this title without translating it into another language. The word “el” refers to both “hand” and “stranger”, but the phrase “el/le”, its mirror image, can be interpreted as “by hand”, “to touch” or “with a stranger”
(Quoted from the Exhibition Brochure.)

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same name, different person?

by • October 30th, 2005

Funny – googled myself (as if I have nothing better to do this morning), and found this poem by another “Stephanie Kent”. Reinforces the importance of that middle “Jo”!
there’s also an alias making loads of bucks (listed by Forbes). envy?
Here’s one I hadn’t come across before, about the disableism workshop Shemaya and I did at Mt Holyoke a few years back.

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Creating a Bicultural Work Group

by • September 23rd, 2005

I presented on this topic to mental health care providers at the National Alliance on Mental Illness conference in Washington, DC a year ago. A one page summary of the presentation has been published online in a pdf file; scroll down to this piece directed to non-deaf professionals on pages 28-29.

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exhausted!

by • March 16th, 2005

The conference was fantabulous. But I am toast! The hosts, Direct Learn Online Conferencing did a tremendous job. So did all of the presenters and participants.
Some links:
Center for Excellence for the Study of Sign Language Interpreting at RIT.
International Congress on Education of the Deaf
There are more that were posted in the actual papers, I’ll dig ’em all out and post them here soon.
Now, I’m off to the gym and then a yummy Mexican dinner – my reward!

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online conference

by • March 15th, 2005

Supporting Deaf People Online has been pretty much taking up my entire life the last three days, but it’s pretty cool. Anne and I have a lot of fascinating discourse to think about.
One downside is fewer deaf participants than I remember from last year. 🙁 Really thought there would be more.
BUT – the collegial environment and quality of discussion has been, I think, phenomenal. I’m really pleased we were able to present, and quite satisfied with the result. I think I even made some new friends! Always a happy thing. 🙂

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seeing and looking

by • February 26th, 2005

Briankle assigned us a terrific book: Stealing the Mona Lisa: What Art Stops Us From Seeing, by Darian Leader. (Another pro and a con critique are posted here, scroll down.)
I’m interested in the way Leader describes the difference between looking and seeing. One may look and not see. Simply, this is perceptually similar to hearing but not listening, however Leader is really dealing with consciousness and what it means to know that one is being looked at without ever knowing for sure what (who?) is being seen.

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deaf do radio

by • February 17th, 2005

~ David sends this gem along:
Interview with Carol Padden and Tom Humphries.
They’ve got a new book out, and their old one is still a classic, Deaf in America. Tom is credited with coining the term, audism, to describe systemic discrimination and prejudice against deaf people.

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anti-video interpreting

by • February 14th, 2005

David Kreuger sent this article, Deaf patients challenge hospital interpreter system, to the DeafVermont list.
Problems with the video relay interpreting have lead to community organizing and a legal challenge. Some hospitals using VRI have been reluctant or refused to hire live interpreters when needed.
Article By PAMELA WOOD, Staff Writer for The Capital, Annapolis, MD

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cultural experiences of time

by • September 30th, 2004

I got some confirmation from one of Eileen’s examples that time is perceived and experienced differently by the Deaf than the hearing. It actually came up a couple times, in a couple of different ways. Betty talked about it in terms of “silence” in an example she gave in the Discussion part of the workshop about what it means to be an ally. She said, “Hearing people hate silence!” I think the emphasis on silence might be … not mistaken, but confused with the experience of time. When there IS a “silence,” hearing people experience the passage of time. This is what makes them nuts, not the silence itself. (Which is not to say that Hearing people like or are comfortable with silence; most Americans are not.) Deaf people, however, are used to experiencing the passage of time during “visual silences” when they are waiting for eye contact to resume. This is what is happening when an audience member comes to stage to make a comment, and the presenter (and the rest of the audience) waits until that person returns to their seat before responding. It’s a form of turn-taking.

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