Organizing Dialogue, Experience and Knowledge for Complex Problem-Solving

Latest: Appealing to a greater vision for INTERPRETING

by • January 6th, 2013

Response to Stephanie Clark’s vlogs about linguistic equality (between American Sign Language and English) and training for Certified Deaf Interpreters. Training and dialogue in ASL are stepping stones to bigger challenges: such as creating a market for CDIs to get work and choosing to trust each other as allies even when we sometimes let each other down. If we focus on the bigger goal, more of the necessary steps will fall into place naturally.

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Latest: Conference of Interpreter Trainers CEUs

by • November 21st, 2012

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Latest: Communication Theory and Simultaneous Interpreting

by • November 4th, 2012

Where is your meaning? Communicating with someone who is fluent in a language different from yours through a simultaneous interpreter is a special practice of intercultural communication. An online course from the Learning Lab for Resiliency will use a think tank approach to exploring the intersection of theory with practice. Information and registration instructions are […]

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Latest: Sign Language Interpreting and Emergency Management

by • November 2nd, 2012

Language for the Eyes It has only taken decades of advocacy and complaints to the FCC, FEMA, and State governments for public officials to respond to Deaf Americans who rely on sign language for communication. The outburst of public response to professional simultaneous interpretation of a signed language during Hurricane Sandy reveals an astonishing range of […]

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Latest: You know it’s bad when you can’t find your own website.

by • October 10th, 2012

I have a lot to write today: a brief description of the MEDIEM/UMass Dashboard tool for online social deliberation, some notes on accommodation concerns, and a public report on the findings of the action learning research that I did in a workshop at RID Region II. The conversation threads with each associated interlocutor-group are simultaneous-they […]

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Latest: Homolingualism and the Interaction Taboo: Simultaneous Interpretation in the European Public Sphere

by • September 10th, 2012

This case study presents conference-style simultaneous interpretation in the European Parliament as a dynamic microcosm for communicating Europe. In the enlarged EP, the regime of controlled multilingualism has been challenged by an emergent pluralingualism in which Members use multiple and mixed languages in addition to the services of simultaneous interpreters. This marks a temporal and paradigmatic shift in the larger game of languages in the European public sphere.

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Latest: A Case for Action Learning: Living the Question Now

by • September 7th, 2012

The present state of general knowledge about simultaneous interpretation is slim, and specialist knowledges are dense and possibly counterproductive to best practice. I chose action learning as my research methodology… Finally (after many years), I can ask (what I think is the best) question in various forms, fitting the question to the particular perspective of the audience or receiver(s) in the given context. Recently, I am living the question with several different groups. The simultaneity of the conversations give me hope that we are, already, somehow living ourselves into the best answer.

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Latest: Practice How You’ll Play: Lessons from the Era of Neil Armstrong

by • August 26th, 2012

Dad watched the time as we drove some winding high mountain highway in the Colorado Rockies. He had purchased a black-and-white television that could be powered from the cigarette lighter to bring along just for this trip. As the target time approached, he pulled onto the shoulder, and sent my brother and I to wag down passers-by and invite them to watch the moon walk with us.

Or maybe it was the moon launch. I don’t remember clearly. The picture was grainy, only a few cars drove by and none of the drivers thought it was important to stop. (I can’t recall if there were any passengers; I don’t recall any consultations.) I think we weirded them out. I know that I felt a little embarrassed, what were we doing, this strange behavior out of the norm of everything I’d ever seen?

I was six years old, just trying to grasp what was happening and why it mattered so much.

How did they get the camera there?! That required foresight, pre-planning and imagination: visionary (imagining things in the category of “we don’t know what we don’t know”) and apocalyptic (“things could go bad”). I feel a sense of nostalgia for that kind of epic

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Latest: Practice How You’ll Play: Lessons from the Era of Neil Armstrong

by • August 26th, 2012

Dad watched the time as we drove some winding high mountain highway in the Colorado Rockies. He had purchased a black-and-white television that could be powered from the cigarette lighter to bring along just for this trip. As the target time approached, he pulled onto the shoulder, and sent my brother and I to wag […]

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Latest: Introduction to Communication Theory for Simultaneous Interpreters

by • June 8th, 2012

iCORE innovative & creative opportunities for research and education Conference of Interpreter Trainers Annual Conference, Pre-Conference Workshop 17 October 2012 Simultaneous interpretation is co-constructed activity with consequences for human society in the dimensions of culture (time) and equality (control). This workshop explores the possibilities and limits of paradigm shift from information-based to relationship-centered professional practices […]

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