Organizing Dialogue, Experience and Knowledge for Complex Problem-Solving

Latest: self-regulation

by • October 1st, 2004

I am worn out from the stimulation. 😉 Got some clarity tonight in Betty’s session on Vygotsky. Lots to mull over and refine in my interpersonal class. Also, the notion of scaffolding groups….that’s more where I see myself in relation to what(ever) my “contribution” might be to the profession. That’s the work on group dynamics and group discourses that I presented today at my poster session. So many things happening here! I got to attend 1/2 of Laurie and Wendy’s session on peer mentoring, and half of Betty and Company’s session on process mediation. I love interpreters! We are so committed to self-knowledge and the development of interpersonal communication skills. 😉

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Latest: Code of Ethics: on “respect”

by • October 1st, 2004

“Interpreters demonstrate respect for all consumers and their diversity.”
I understand that the term

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Latest: cultural experiences of time

by • September 30th, 2004

I got some confirmation from one of Eileen’s examples that time is perceived and experienced differently by the Deaf than the hearing. It actually came up a couple times, in a couple of different ways. Betty talked about it in terms of “silence” in an example she gave in the Discussion part of the workshop about what it means to be an ally. She said, “Hearing people hate silence!” I think the emphasis on silence might be … not mistaken, but confused with the experience of time. When there IS a “silence,” hearing people experience the passage of time. This is what makes them nuts, not the silence itself. (Which is not to say that Hearing people like or are comfortable with silence; most Americans are not.) Deaf people, however, are used to experiencing the passage of time during “visual silences” when they are waiting for eye contact to resume. This is what is happening when an audience member comes to stage to make a comment, and the presenter (and the rest of the audience) waits until that person returns to their seat before responding. It’s a form of turn-taking.

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Latest: Legacy of “Allies”

by • September 30th, 2004

Confusion was the main emotion at most of the Allies conferences (spilling out sometimes as rage, sometimes as grief). I strongly believe that the Allies conferences were an important attempt to try and address some of the deep sociopolitical differences among and between Deaf folk and interpreters. I do believe that many individuals benefitted personally from the experience, but overall, the conferences did not move us toward any kind of collective understanding. Why they failed, given the good intentions and positive desires of the founders, participants, and later planners, has been a puzzle that I continue to think about.
First, let me record what happened today.

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Latest: Terminology

by • September 30th, 2004

Since I think the ways we talk about things have a great deal to do with dynamics, I was fascinated by some of the anecdotes and jokes about certain terms. For instance:
RSC – originally known as the “reverse skills certificate” was renamed the “relay skills certificate” at least partially because RID wanted to maintain the same initials. (Thanks to Betty Colonomos for sharing this historicial tidbit with us.) Eileen made a joke about driving in reverse as an example of the kind of metaphor, or implied meaning, might have been “hidden” in the original term. (Now the certification for Deaf persons who are trained as interpreters is CDI – Certified Deaf Interpreter, which Betty also let us know has its problems: the linguistic construction in English indicates that it is the “deafness” that is being “certified”; not the interpretation skills!) Betty suggested, when one is trying to explain to hearing interlocutors why a Deaf interpreter is needed, describing them as a “specialist.”

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Latest: Eileen Forestal ROCKS!

by • September 30th, 2004

I was (am still) overwhelmed by the amount of stimulation I received from Eileen’s presentation, “Teaching Deaf Interpreting Processes.” She and I are looking at a very similar subject – what I usually call dynamics – but in different ways from our different experiences and positions. I’m going to try and organize some of my thoughts in a few separate posts…

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Latest: virgin experience

by • September 29th, 2004

It’s been a long time since I’ve been in an all-signing environment; my eyes are rusty! We had a characteristically Deaf start at my first ever Interpreter Trainers convention, the keynote began only 50 minutes past the scheduled time. I, in my introvert fashion, found a seat to plant myself while most folks schmoozed. Anna R. knows how to work a crowd! I exchanged greetings with lots of people from Allies

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Latest: EU directorate general

by • September 25th, 2004

David has located a wonderful site for me! The EU Directorate General for Interpretation! I’m gonna have to peruse this site thoroughly. 🙂 It’s a great site and the timing couldn’t be better! How do you say thank you in Hungarian? 😉

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Latest: Andy Warhol in Brattleboro!

by • September 15th, 2004

The town’s agog with a special exhibit at our (fairly small!) museum which includes items from a private collection apparently not shown in public before.
The opening gala was covered by the local paper this past Monday: Wild About Warhol. (I often have trouble with the links to the local paper; they seem to take 2-3 tries to get through. If you want the article via email, let me know – I sent a copy to myself.)
I was contacted about interpreting this event but couldn’t manage to squeeze it in. Besides, what would I have worn? I’d have looked like I was slumming!

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Latest: Gutmann & Thompson

by • September 11th, 2004

They make no bones about being prescriptive and laying out the principles and values that “should” inform deliberation. I agree with many, if not all of them, but doubt everyone does, or would, or even should. My agreement is probably based upon (emanates from?) a subjectivity similar to theirs, but I don’t think I want everyone I interact with to be boilerplated along “my” lines (! Horrors!)
While I am attracted to the idealism and possibility in Habermas (as I understand the distillation of his views, having not yet squeezed him in ~ even via Bryan’s audio link), what a bland, dull, and monotonous mode of production.
I am intrigued, however, by the chart G&T have put together on p. 53, contrasting prudence, reciprocity, and impartiality as principled (philosophical?) bases for approaching moral disagreement. The notable absence in sign language interpreter’s code of ethics (in the US) of any mention of “impartiality” has been a gap that has drawn my attention for a variety of reasons, but this reading has me wondering if there is an even deeper debate between/among members of the Deaf community and sign language interpreters – one which challenges the basic assumptions embodied in

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