Organizing Dialogue, Experience and Knowledge for Complex Problem-Solving

same name, different person?

by • October 30th, 2005

Funny – googled myself (as if I have nothing better to do this morning), and found this poem by another “Stephanie Kent”. Reinforces the importance of that middle “Jo”!
there’s also an alias making loads of bucks (listed by Forbes). envy?
Here’s one I hadn’t come across before, about the disableism workshop Shemaya and I did at Mt Holyoke a few years back.

Read More

Leave a Comment

discourses in tension?

by • January 28th, 2005

I had a great day working today. My teammate was (is!) awesome. ๐Ÿ™‚ We had the best conversation at lunch, about her workshop on discretion (which gets as much of a plug as I can give it), and a quasi-update on where I am with the research on role.
Our conversation was fascinating because it was going along just fine, full of investigatory questions and comments, and then it got tense! Why? It was right before we had to get back to work…..and then didn’t come up again….but was really on my mind. Why? Was I presenting my hypotheses and tentative findings in an ethnocentric or oppressive way? It worked out that we walked to our cars together, and the moment arose for me to ask if she’d felt the conversation get tense. (Maybe it was just me?) Yes, she had noticed! And she thought it was about something she was doing! Being too questioning or too …. something (I can’t recall her word – persistent, maybe).

Read More

3 Comments

demand-control theory

by • October 2nd, 2004

I attended part of Robyn’s workshop on observation supervision, and can see immediately why so many people have told me to check out her work. There are definitely many overlaps. ๐Ÿ™‚
Demands are, simply, those tasks required of the job itself. Controls are the decisions one takes/makes to manage the delivery of these tasks.
Controls sound a lot like regulation in the Vygotskian sense (see previous post). Robyn described them as “decisions, actions, and attitudes – even recognizing a demand is a control” (not necessarily an exact quote, smile). There seems to be an implication that these controls are conscious? Since I don’t know the whole theory, I may be speculating way “out of turn” (surprise!), but it seems like putting the two approaches into dialogue with each other might be really productive. For instance, does demand-control theory itself recognize that some controls are unconscious (meaning habitual or reactive)?

Read More

Leave a Comment

Vygotsky

by • October 2nd, 2004

Between the process mediation workshop and Betty’s poster session on self-regulation, I finally have a conceptual understanding of

Read More

Leave a Comment

cultural experiences of time

by • September 30th, 2004

I got some confirmation from one of Eileen’s examples that time is perceived and experienced differently by the Deaf than the hearing. It actually came up a couple times, in a couple of different ways. Betty talked about it in terms of “silence” in an example she gave in the Discussion part of the workshop about what it means to be an ally. She said, “Hearing people hate silence!” I think the emphasis on silence might be … not mistaken, but confused with the experience of time. When there IS a “silence,” hearing people experience the passage of time. This is what makes them nuts, not the silence itself. (Which is not to say that Hearing people like or are comfortable with silence; most Americans are not.) Deaf people, however, are used to experiencing the passage of time during “visual silences” when they are waiting for eye contact to resume. This is what is happening when an audience member comes to stage to make a comment, and the presenter (and the rest of the audience) waits until that person returns to their seat before responding. It’s a form of turn-taking.

Read More

Leave a Comment

Legacy of “Allies”

by • September 30th, 2004

Confusion was the main emotion at most of the Allies conferences (spilling out sometimes as rage, sometimes as grief). I strongly believe that the Allies conferences were an important attempt to try and address some of the deep sociopolitical differences among and between Deaf folk and interpreters. I do believe that many individuals benefitted personally from the experience, but overall, the conferences did not move us toward any kind of collective understanding. Why they failed, given the good intentions and positive desires of the founders, participants, and later planners, has been a puzzle that I continue to think about.
First, let me record what happened today.

Read More

Leave a Comment

Berdahl (again!)

by • July 14th, 2004

“[Informant] Thomas Speigal[‘s] warning about judging the past from the perspective of the present, about the simultaneous solidification of boundaries and blurring of distinctions between victims and perpetrators” (p. 217).
This quote continues her analysis of the commemoration parade, in a chapter she calls “Dis-membered Border”. This seems (to me, smile) to parallel my relational struggle – we are contesting who was/is “victim” and who was/is “perpetrator.” I see the ways in which both of us did both, AND my “20/20 hindsight” perceives the discursive evidence (what was said and what was not said) in much sharper relief than I heard at the time. I need to learn to hear/interpret differently (or at least with other possibilities in mind) and I think this is the crux of acting into a new discursive future when one recognizes a PM.
Berdahl’s work doesn’t ground the discursive “collision” in any specific microsocial instant of real interaction – she juxtaposes what people said in one context with what they say in another context. This is what I hope to do with the critical discourse analysis paper that I intend to write analysing the key new finding (a discovery!) from the workshop in

Read More

Leave a Comment

Going to Alaska!

by • April 19th, 2004

We are going to rock the house! ๐Ÿ™‚ Spent today refining the design; I’m feeling quite good about it.
I’m building on success from Boston’s PM/WAD workshop at the CGO, where we really nailed a problematic moment with a sophisticated group of organizational diversity consultants. Exhausting (I’ll need good rest!), but gives me a great sense of optimism for the large group activity in the workshop. Had a fun flurry of emails today from the organizers – always love to pick up the jazz via cyberspace!
Also building on all the recent paper-writing on problematic moments (and aren’t I glad THAT’s done for awhile!) and the CGO workshop, I did something new while interpreting last week that I’ve never done before and don’t recall seeing anyone else do. There was a moment of din – when literally everyone in the group burst out with something at the same time. Instead of trying to continue with the thread of the primary speaker’s comment I represented the verbal action of the din. It felt…right, somehow. ๐Ÿ™‚ The Deaf interlocutor was with the group’s outburst, not informed of it after the fact.

Read More

Leave a Comment